Where Will SMB Marketing Be in Five Years?

I had the pleasure of attending BIA/Kelsey‘s 2014 Leading in Local SMB Digital Marketing Conference in New Orleans a few weeks ago. This was my first SMB related BIA/Kelsey conference in five years, after going for several years. I also had the pleasure of sitting on the Thought Leaders & Decision Makers panel. My co-panelists were Annette Tonti, SVP at The Search Agency and Eric Owen, CEO at Mono Solutions. The panel was co-moderated by Michael Boland, Chief Analyst and VP Content at BIA/Kelsey, and Charles Laughlin, SVP and Managing Director at BIA/Kelsey. The panel was free-form, vibrant and I thoroughly enjoyed myself.

There were a few questions posed, all positioned in a “looking five years ahead” context. What struck me most was how aligned the panelists were on our forecasts and no doubt it’ll be interesting to look back at our answers five years from now – especially about the affiliate programmes getting so popular in every niche, from food to insurance (visit their website to see the conditions).

The video (30 min) from the panel is below and here’s Mike Boland’s blog post on the panel on the BIA/Kelsey blog. I’d love to get your thoughts, especially if you feel differently about these topics or our perspectives.

Adios 2010

Adios 2010, sayonara, salaam, lehit, au revoir, ciao. There aren’t enough ways to say goodbye to 2010. It was a tough year for America, and for much of the world. Speaking for myself, professionally, 2010 was a year I’ll never forget. Truth be told, I’ve been thinking about this blog post for some time now. I’ve fantasized about addressing the entrepreneurial challenges I faced in 2010, facing of a severely depressed economy, an increasingly crowded local search segment, a handful of souring investor relationships, among other disappointments. But I’ve changed my mind. I’m going to spare you, my reader, from my bitching and from some opportunistic ‘lessons learned’ and drop my weapon so as to not injure anyone. Instead, I’ll end this year’s blogging, this decade’s blogging, by closing the chapter on a decade and an era I’m most grateful for.

As some of you likely know, it was announced in early December that CitySquares was sold to Backyard, a west coast based startup with funding from Google CEO Eric Schmidt, celebrity entrepreneur and investor Jason Calacanis, and self described greedy, blood-sucking venture capitalist Dave McClure. It’s not the investors that make Backyard exciting, to me anyway (although it certainly has a nice ring to it), it’s the founder and CEO Steve Espinosa. I’ve known Steve for a few years now, and at 22 he’s already a very well admired veteran of the Local space and I’d bet on him any day of the week. So it’s an honor to have sold CitySquares to such a great guy with an equally great vision.

Now that CitySquares is largely behind me (I will still be involved as an advisor), I’m moving on from Local. Plainly put, 2010 kicked my ass, and CitySquares’ prospects for regaining its edge wasn’t getting any brighter as this year passed for reasons I won’t get into right now (but I will once the dust settles). As Greg Sterling penned on his site announcing the acquisition of CitySquares,

Given the noise and competition now in local Saren is not unahppy about exiting the segment for now…When CitySquares launched, for example, there was no Google Places, no Facebook Deals, no Groupon and no Foursquare (et al).

There’s a whole lot of truth in those two sentences. More truth than you know. I can proudly say that CitySquares pioneered hyper-local search. No one was doing local search at the neighborhood level until CitySquares came along – and I mean really doing it at the neighborhood level. And to this day, I will boldly state that still, no one has the mashup of hyper-local geospatial data and local business listings that CitySquares.com has. Alas, the mobile platform is the future of local search, of hyper-local search. OK, it’s not the future, it’s the now! So of the many things I can hang my hat on as I close the door on my CitySquares.com chapter, this is one of them.

Another thing I can hang my hat on are my relationships with countless people, of so many background, cultures, and talents. I’m proud to call many entrepreneurs, investors, employees, associates, vendors, partners, across the country and in many corners of the globe colleagues, acquaintances, even friends. CitySquares took me places I never imagined going, both literally and figuratively. I’m most proud of this.

So it’s with both excitement and with sadness that I say goodbye to 2010, and with open arms that I welcome 2011. I will be making an announcement about my next step within the next week or two. In short, it’s a big change for me, and a change I’m thrilled about.

Before I sign off for the year, I’d like to wish you a very healthy, happy, prosperous 2011. See you on the other side!

Au revoir

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Speaking at Marketplaces 2010

The Kelsey Group is like the ESPN of the local search and advertising world. They’re the authority. They host about four major conferences every year, attracting industry insiders from around the globe. Their next one is next week in San Diego, called MARKETPLACES 2010: THE LOCAL VERTICAL OPPORTUNITY. It’s the who’s-who and that what’s-what of local and vertical solutions and advertising. I’ve attended numerous Kelsey shows and have come to know the Kelsey staff as warm and generous professionals, and many of the conference regulars. The Kelsey Group and their conferences have been absolutely critical for CitySquares. If it wasn’t for them and their shows, I don’t think we’d be a player on this big and competitive field.

I was asked to speak at the Marketplaces show alongside Colin Pape with ShopCity and David Vazdauskas of Local Thunder. The panel will be moderated by Steve Marshall, who I always enjoy. He doesnt pull punches and he adds a certain kind of intensity to the panels. I’m looking forward to it.

I’ll be at the show from Sunday through Wednesday with my colleague and VP National Sales Todd Salerno. We have a few meetings teed up but if you’d like to catch up with one of us just email me, tweet me or send smoke signals, whatever works for ya!

If anyone wants to go, but does not yet have tickets, please get in touch with me, I have a discount code for you to save a little.

Looking forward to seeing a whole lotta people! See you there!

“You stay classy San Diego” – Ron Burgundy

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Local 1.0

I believe that this local search thing is quite early, and to keep up with the Jones’ I’ve started to refer to it as Local 1.0. Hear me out here, because I’m diving deep.

Web 1.0 was a passive web, about adoption and about moving to an interconnected digital medium, and Web 2.0 is very much about participation, creation, and transforming that interconnected digital medium into a platform. Just as Web 1.0 was static, passive, and largely about adoption, so is local, today, and as we’ve come to know it.

Resourceful Idiot does a pretty decent job of explaining the iterations of the Internet. He starts by saying:

“You can group each of the ‘Web x.x’ as a different movement when it comes to internet usage. Web 1.0 is the movement that took place during the beginning of the internet.”

Web 1.0 was about adoption, and about the movement of media, business, and commerce, to the digital medium that is the World Wide Web. Everyone was moving online to reach a larger audience and achieve better efficiencies. The first to move was big media like newspapers, news stations, music, magazines, etc. Everyday services and resources went online, like the post office, libraries, phone books, the dictionary, the encyclopedia, public transportation services, travel agencies, shipping services, mortgage companies, banks, day trading. Consumer services, business services, B2C, B2B, all of them were moving their data and content to the web. All of this content was mostly static, and that was fine. Continue reading Local 1.0

Webcast: Localized Search

I am a guest speaker in an Editor & Publisher webcast on May 22. If you can make the time, please join in. Details are as follows…

Stop the Presses! Localized Search is Changing the Newspaper Business


Discover How Your Company Can Take Advantage of This Evolving Model

for this FREE live Web broadcast.

Date: Tuesday, May 22, 2007
Time: 2:00 PM EST / 11:00 AM PST

Join Editor & Publisher for this FAST-sponsored Web Seminar and hear from industry experts how your newspaper operation can break into the localized search market. Attend this online-only event and learn how to overcome the obstacles and how progressive newspapers have already integrated localized search into their business models and have grown their audience and advertising base and how you can do the same.

Whatever the formula for local search inclusion may be, the newspaper industry and news industry in general are looking to get their piece of the pie. But how do newspaper companies tap into the growing local search market? What technology is needed? Is there a chance of cannibalizing the existing print base?

In this session, the following issues will be explored:

Market Size

Trends and Technology

Geotargeted Display Ads

E-mail Campaigns

Classifieds

Local Paid Search

Local Video

Citysquares.com: Part 1

Today I had a meeting with the founders of Spot Story, Aron and Matthew. I briefly met them at WebInno last week. It was at the end of the evening and the room was clearing out, they were still fielding questions and performing demos. We spoke for a couple minutes, exchanged business cards and promised each other we’d speak over the coming days. Today we did that, at Diesel Cafe in Davis Square. During our long, and caffeinated, conversation they asked me about the back story to Citysquares. It was the first time I’d heard that question in a few weeks. As I was telling the story I thought to myself how I hadn’t really told the story on Your Suspect. So, here goes it…

As I mentioned in a previous post, I had been a loyal Sidewalk.com user in the mid/late 90s. I found it exceptionally useful and more readily available than some of the local rags in town. Sometimes I’d find a great event or restaurant on Sidewalk and I’d head out with some friends for a night out on the town. I would tell friends about Sidewalk.com and they’d become loyal users. Eventually Sidewalk.com was gone, and replaced by Citysearch. I was never able to get the same enjoyment from Citysearch. Sidewalk.com was my first experience with what is now coined ‘local search.’

Well, as the years went by and I established roots in Somerville, mainly in and around the Davis Square neighborhood, I longed for something like Sidewalk.com. I worked at Delphi.com and Prospero Technologies starting in 1999 and ending in 2001 (after surviving 3 rounds of layoffs). Those were the dot-com boom days. Even then, with all the hype around this whole Internet thing, I grew exceeding frustrated with the lack of localized content. I still couldn’t adapt to Citysearch. Other local sites like The Boston Phoenix, Boston.com, and maybe a couple others, just didn’t do it for me. I still couldn’t find truly local content.

So this continued throughout the next few years. At times, I’d voice my frustration about this to my wife and she’d agree with me – why can’t we find the hours for her hair salon down the street? Doing a web search (now called “googling” by many) would yield very little, if any, local information about her hair salon. This was frustrating. So we’d pull down, from atop our refrigerator, an old, dusty copy of the Verizon Yellow Pages. It may have done the trick, it may have not. The frustrations remained with us.

In the winter of 2003, it was late at night and I was sick with a really bad stomach bug. I was very ill. I needed some medicine – just something over-the-counter to help me get through the night. Ali was at her sister’s house in New Hampshire for the night. Just down the street from us, here in Davis Square, there’s a pharmacy. For the life of me, I can never remember which pharmacy it is. Is it a CVS? A Walgreen’s? Brooks? I can never recall. Ali laughs at me for this a lot – and I laugh too. But at the time, it wasn’t funny. I’m not exaggerating when I say that it was winter, it was Boston, and it was very cold and even snowing. The circumstances couldn’t have been worse. The problem I was faced with was this: I don’t know which pharmacy it is, I can’t find anything online, I don’t have a phone book anywhere (that I knew of) and I either tough it out and be sick all night long, or I brave the elements and walk into the square to see if the pharmacy was open. That’s it – I just needed to know if the pharmacy was open. If it was open, ok, great, I can find some medicine. If not, I’m in a jam. Ali has the car. What to do, what to do. If this information was available to me online, I could make an easy decision. So, I bundled up and walked into the square only to find out that Brooks Pharmacy was closed. Needless to say, my night only worsened.

It wasn’t long after this event that I’d contemplated building a very basic website with a listing of all the businesses in Davis Square. Davis Square has a vibrant and moderately young demographic. Back in the day, Davis Square was a little seedy, but up and coming. In the 90s Davis had blossomed into a vibrant somewhat trendy community but still with a truly local and Boston kind of feel to it. And Tufts University is right down the street so surely a more transient crowd would dig something like a free online resource listing the businesses and other local resources. (Interesting side note, in 1997 Davis Square was called the hippest place to live in the US by UTNE Reader)

I decided to pursue this idea. I set out to buy davissquare.com. It was already owned by someone (still is), and my negotiations with him went nowhere fast. When I briefly explained to him what I wanted to do, he wanted to be my partner. But I wasn’t looking for a partner, I wasn’t even looking to make this a business. I was just looking to build a really simple, even bland, web based directory of all the businesses in Davis Square. That’s it. No business model, no purpose other than scratching an itch. I didn’t get far with buying davissquare.com. Discouraged, and preoccupied with life, I let the idea slip away. It never quite left me though. From time to time over the coming weeks, months, years I’d become momentarily inspired to do it again – but it never went anywhere.

Fast forward over many less significant but similar moments and experiences trying to find local businesses online, but ultimately resulting in frustrations, to the summer of 2005, August 13th to be exact. I’d been shaving my head for several years, by myself, at home, with a Braun clipper. It was a Saturday morning around 7am, and I was going at it in the kitchen. Standing up, facing the floor, with the clipper shaving the back of my head, watching the short hairs fall to the floor in neat clumps. Just then, the clipper started making noises – scary noises. The kind of noises that make you think holding an electric tool to your skull is a really bad idea. It started vibrating in an odd way. My head was barely shaved! It can’t break now! But it did. After several convulsive vibrations and erratic movements and frightening noises, it stopped working. I unplugged it and just stood there in the kitchen, staring at the clipper, and thinking how I must look like a total freak with only the back of my head shaved. Now what was I to do? I had to find a barber.

Now, mind you, the biggest reason I started shaving my head several years ago was because I’d grown frustrated with the local barbershops. No matter where I’d gone, they all did a lousy job. I’d even gone so far as to go to a couple salons. But I don’t like the salon experience. I grew up with barbers all my life. As a kid, my father and I would go to the same barber every two weeks, for years and years. Now, I was in a situation where I’d desperately needed a barber or a salon – anything to help me.

Here we go again: I “googled” (sorry Google lawyers) “barbers davis square” only to be presented with basically nothing (note that now, when you google “barbers davis square” the first result is for Citysquares.com Laughing). I knew there was at least one barbershop in Davis Square, but it was 7am – were they open? Yes – the same problem folks. The phone book was no help to me because I didn’t know the name of the barber shop I was looking for. I only knew it was on Highland Ave. But what number Highland Ave? Was it 16 Highland Ave or 1600 Highland Ave? Thankfully I wasn’t dealing with a violent stomach illness – only a massacred hairdo. I knew I’d survive this. So I put a hat on, and walked into the square. Guess what? The barber shop was closed. So I went and got a coffee, and soon had a repaired hairdo. The barber had a good laugh.

On Sunday, August 14th, my wife and I were talking, once again, about just how frustrating it was to find any truly local information about the businesses in our neighborhood. What is wrong with the world!? Why is this so difficult? And there it was – square between the eyes – I’m going to do this. Finally. I’m going to create this! No more davissquare.com negotiations, no more frustrations. It’s time for me to do this.

I sat in the same chair I’m sitting in right now, in my living room, and just let the ideas flood my brain. They kept coming. I just started writing the ideas down. I started thinking of brand ideas, domain names, content and feature ideas. Then it hit me again – open source. It’s so easy to build websites now, to build online applications, content management, whatever it was I wanted to do it was nothing like the old days of the web. It wouldn’t cost $500,000 and half an army to build it, and still take a year.

As I became more excited about the idea, I still had the vision of this being a free service to consumers like myself. I didn’t have a business model in mind, I wasn’t thinking about making money with tobedefined.com. I started to tell Ali about my brainstorm. She really is my better half and she has a very good instinct for things – be it people, ideas, just about anything. As soon as she let me explain the idea, she went nuts – she loved it. That was when I knew I had something. It wasn’t because of anything other than Ali’s enthusiasm that really got me moving. I started tossing out domain names to her: Neighborhoods.com? Nah, that’s gone. Cityblocks.com? Nah, that’s gone. Countless others. Ali said, “Citysquares.com?” I said, “I thought of that but I’m sure it’s taken. It’s gotta be taken.” Sure enough, there it was – available. I wasted no time. Nine dollars later the domain was mine.

More ideas flooded my brain, and I couldn’t write them down fast enough. Then I saw the business opportunity. Local businesses, merchants, moms-and-pops, whatever you want to call them – they had to agree, right? They had to see the light too! I mean, they advertise in newspapers, and in the phone book, and a small number even do online stuff, and I already knew for a fact that 60% of all small, local merchants didn’t have a website, and those that did only had brochure-sites. Even those brochure-sites aren’t updated often, if at all. So there was the real heart of it – a lack of an easy way for a business, like a barbershop or a local apothecary, to advertise online and just make their relevant business information available in a single, online, consolidated format. The idea was getting legs, very quickly. It was growing by the minute, but also getting more complex. Just the thing I was looking for.

My next step was to make a call. Bob Leland, my good friend and a colleague of mine at the time, was a brilliant UI and UX guy. He was as good as they get, and more importantly, we’d worked together for quite a while, though thick and thin, and he was my go-to guy for creative visionary type stuff, for online product positioning, for bringing an idea from my mind’s eye to a presentation format. I spent the next two hours on the phone with him, while pacing around my porch, sipping a beer. We just went nuts dissecting the concept and really asking ourselves if this made any sense. He could totally identify with my frustrations with Citysearch and Yellow Pages, and the lack of this kind of information in general, online. Bob loved it, truly loved it. After more than two hours on the phone, we agreed that we’d let the idea sit for a couple days and think about it further and let it all sink in. So, we did.

Over the next two days the idea grew and grew, and the notepads piled up. Ali’s enthusiasm grew as much as my own. On Tuesday, Bob called me and told me he had something he wanted me to see. He sent me five jpeg files with instructions on the order I should open them. They were comps – static graphics for his vision of Citysquares.com. I was floored – absolutely floored. Stunned and floored. I remember the energy and adrenaline swelling inside me when I saw his graphics bring my vision to life.

Over the coming days we had the early makings of a real business. I managed to pull my father into this, and my good friend Chris Miller. On October 13, after 6 weeks of non stop meetings, development, design, planning, and campaigning we had the first iteration of Citysquares.com up online and we kicked it off with an official launch party in Davis Square.

Bob is now my co-founder and VP of Product Development. Chris is our Sales Manager. Fifteen months later we’re still having as much fun as we were in August of 2005. The challenges are totally different now of course. We’re running an Internet startup. But we’re on a mission, and we’re here to stay. Make no mistake about that either – Citysquares.com is here to stay.

Looking back at all the incidents and motivations behind Citysquares, before it was really a concept, I’m really glad that I didn’t do it sooner. Any sooner and it could have been a real mess. The market is ready now, it wasn’t back a few years ago. The technology is available, and only keeps getting more exciting. Users weren’t totally there yet either. Now, in 2007, we’re in great shape to do what we envision.

As Citysquares.com stands today, as a website, a consumer-facing service, and a platform for local merchants to market themselves, we recognize that there’s so much more work to do. It’s not quite there yet. This is the infancy of Citysquares.com. We’ve got lots planned for the next few months, for 2007, 2008, and beyond.

I’ve made this long enough. I’ll follow up with more at a later time. There’s so much more to tell and I look forward to it!

The Local Web is the Future of the Web

It’s a funny coincidence. I was speaking with someone at a cafe the other day and I was amp’d up on caffeine. I mean, really amp’d up on caffeine. You know, like so amp’d up that I’m not really seeing what’s right before my eyes because the sun is bouncing around my enlarged pupils and distorting color and light? Right… that kind of amp’d up on caffeine. The conversation we were having was about what this ‘local’ thing is really all about, and why I, as he put it, as “founder and visionary for Citysquares.com,” seem so compelled and dedicated to it. I very enthusiastically explained that this ‘local’ thing is more than just an untapped market with big money potential. He rolled his eyes and looked at me like I was just another capitalistic entrepreneur trying to rationalize my true ambitions. I didn’t mind actually, because I will readily admit to anyone that yes, of course Citysquares is a business – not a charity. But if I may, I like to think that it’s a socially responsible business, one that’s focused on actually doing something good for our communities, one that has a real mission (not the corporate charter type either), for local business, for consumerism, for the citizens, for everyone – for, if I may, all the stakeholders. I reminded him of the story behind Citysquares, why I started it in the first place.

It’s also about the future. By that I mean that it’s about the future of our communities, my children’s future, the future of local commerce, of America, and the future of the Internet. That’s right – the Internet, that big monstrosity that’s you can’t touch, you can’t totally make sense of, that is so full of opportunity and promise that the opportunity for danger and destruction is just as frightening. The future of the Internet is about what’s right across the street from you. What’s local to you? Well, that’s the future of the Internet.

Humans need humans. Humans need interaction with each other. It’s not good enough to blog, to instant message, to SMS, to send pictures, share documents, post videos on YouTube, add another widget to your Myspace page, fly through the sky in Second Life. We, like much of the animal kingdom, are hardwired to need each other in an offline forum. The Internet, for the most part, does not help us feel more connected – it largely makes us feel more isolated. Call it existentialism, call it what you will. But these are my theories and these are my beliefs. The Internet is a great way to supplant the connections we lack in today’s society – a bandage, not a cure. We’re seeking something, as people, a greater understanding, enlightenment, a higher power maybe, human interaction, so many things. The Internet is a result of this, and will become more of an instrument for these puzzles just as much as praying is to some people, or just as the Hubble telescope or SETI is to other people.

I’ll stop myself there before I get too philosophical and ultimately keep myself awake tonight wondering if I articulated myself properly.

The funny coincidence is within a blog post that I stumbled upon yesterday. Here’s a small taste for you:

“Key to the development of a local online ad market is the identification of the local web, and this offers a remarkable opportunity for those willing to explore this territory today. In the not-too-distant future, everyone will have access to the local web, but this access is unavailable today, because the database hasn’t been created. It exists in bits and pieces, but no technology can replace the human research necessary to build the initial database. This is a task that will pay huge dividends to the one who creates it, market-by-market, and there’s no reason this can’t be done by a local media company.”

and

“The local web is where the web itself will find its real value propositions, and that’s enough to make a guy want to stick around for awhile.”

That’s enough for me. It does a great job of making the case better than I could’ve even after 5 more cups of coffee.

If you’re interested in local, community, the Internet, the future, advertising, all or one of the above, than I highly recommend you read this.

Fond memories of Sidewalk.com

John Kelsey has a nice piece on The Kelsey Group blog about Sidewalk.com, and Steve Ballmer’s regrets of dumping it. I have to admit that it’s nice to finally see some acknowledgment by Microsoft that this was a mistake. Because that’s ultimately what it is. Sidewalk.com was a fantastic site back in the day. In the mid/late 90’s I used Sidewalk.com quite a bit. I used it to find music shows in Boston and Cambridge, to find restaurants, and so much more. I really think Sidewalk.com was one of the best “local search” sites that’s ever existed – and mind you, that’s before the term “local search” was ever in our vocabularies. Every since Citysearch purchased Sidewalk from Microsoft in 1999, I think it’s fair to say a lot of people were disappointed. I remember just a few months ago I was presenting Citysquares.com to a group at Babson and I fondly mentioned Sidewalk. A couple people in the audience quite exuberantly nodded their heads as if they knew exactly what I was fondly recollecting. Over the past year or so, fans of Citysquares, or just about anyone that I’ve mentioned Sidewalk to, also have fond memories of Sidewalk. Anyway, suffice to say Sidewalk left a very good impression with a lot of people.

Can there ever be another Sidewalk.com? I don’t think so. It was the Model T – the first of its kind.

Newspapers and Local Search – what’s wrong??

A validating little piece on The Praized Blog today and Don Dodge’s blog about the Local Search space and if/why newspapers get-it. I could not agree more with this, as some of my previous posts might indicate (in more or less words).

Ultimately I think this comes down to two major issues with the papers. And by papers I’m referring to the top dogs like The New York Times, and small community papers and TownOnline (here in New England). In fact, I had the opportunity to interact with an exec at TownOnline/Herald Interactive and there was a sort of arrogance there – like they’re so far ahead of the rest of us that we should be so lucky. And looking at them a year + later, nothing’s changed. So actually, let me make this 3 major issues:

  1. Arrogance: Just through my experience with Herald Interactive/TownOnline, and even some indirect communications with The Boston Globe and Boston.com – there’s a very old-school, conservative mentality. I have a contact at a large IBank who deals with these folks and he and I talk often about the hard-headedness of these folks. I’ve been introduced to a few people at these papers and they just can’t be bothered. At the risk of sounding bitter (maybe I’m too late), I’ll stop there.
  2. Stodgy: I think there’s a lack of innovative and forward thinking leadership at a lot of these companies. Folks, it’s 2007. If you’re a newspaper and you haven’t made a big Internet play yet – you’re in deep doo-doo. I commend the NYT for making some big big changes over the past year or so. I love what they’ve done and I find myself using those features and logging in more often every week. Great job NYT! Boston.com – wish I could say the same for you. I don’t think this has as much to do with #1 and #3 as much as it simply has to do with an old-school, stodgy, good ol’ boys club mentality.
  3. Techno what? Yes, no doubt there is a lack of technological initiative and strategy. But you can’t expect a newspaper with the first and second characteristics to embrace technology, can you? I haven’t really seen any major paper embrace technology in a meaningful way with a few exceptions (NYT, WSJ). Those exceptions have not only embraced technology, but they’ve also integrated into their business model – they’ve made adjustments. And as time goes on, things seems to working out fairly well.

All of this circles back to why they haven’t made a significant local-search play. The reasons for me are obvious, but I’m not a newspaper industry expert – no really, I’m not. Surprised I’m glad, too. Because there’s a market for me and Citysquares.com that allows us to make a big move. Question is, how long will it take for them to make another adjustment? I’m not too concerned, but my antennas are definitely up and tuned in.