Is the Phone the New Wallet? I’m not so sure.

A couple of weeks ago I was interviewed on Boston Public Radio’s Innovation Hub with Kara Miller. The discussion was about mobile payments, mobile shopping, and other consumer spending and payment trends. The broadcast aired again this morning and can be heard here on demand.

This morning I wrote a blog post on the Litle & Co. blog to further explain my thinking on mobile payments. What do you think? Am I too sour on the prospects for mobile payments in the near term?

Passion Renewed

Just as entrepreneurship requires unbridled enthusiasm, passion, and dare I say faith, so does a job. I know that may come as a surprise to some, because rarely do most of us wake up in the morning and spring out of bed with unbridled enthusiasm for going to their job. But success doesn’t come without it.

I recently started my new job (yes, a job) at Litle & Co., just north of Boston in Lowell. Litle employees a little less than 200 people. It’s a very innovative company that powers the payment processing for brands like Gilt Group, GoDaddy, Overstock, and many others. I’ve known a number of Litle employees for over a decade, including a couple of the executives. As Litle’s new Vice President of Marketing I’ve been asked to affect change not only in Marketing, but within the organization as a whole. Now, I get to take so many of the lessons I’ve learned as an entrepreneur for the past 10 years, and apply them to an established, profitable, growing company as a member of the management team. I’m humbled, flattered, honored, as well as excited, enthusiastic, and passionate. And I know of no other way to go about it.

I’ve been doing my own thing for 10 years – exactly to the day actually. It was January 4, 2001, when I was one of the last people left at an Internet startup in Cambridge, MA, and laid off. I woke up on January 5, 2001 and said to myself, “I’m never doing that again.” So I embarked on a 10 year journey of entrepreneurship, starting with Atomic in the first five years, and concluding with CitySquares over the last five. On January 4, 2011 I started in my new role at Litle – doing it again!

I’ve spent a lot of time over the past several months reviewing all I’ve done, won, lost, learned, and earned over the past 10 years. I’m now in my mid thirties. I embarked on this journey in my mid twenties. How much things have changed. It’s hard to quantify who and what I’ve become, and frankly I don’t think it’s interesting reading. So let me put it like this: For a variety of reasons I did not graduate high school. I was asked to leave actually. I wasn’t thrown out, to be clear, in the classic sense. Rather, I was asked to leave and advised to “start my life.” That was a very sad day. I’ll never forget it. I’ll never forget the feeling I had when I drove by my old high school on graduation day – choked up about what I was missing, about what I’d never experience. Choked up about what my friends were experiencing, about what they’d never forget. Jealous, yes, but sad, regretful, disappointed in myself. Not long after I went out and got my GED, something I’m embarrassed to admit here publicly. A few years later I tried my hand at college, at Bunker Hill Community College. That lasted one semester, barely.

A few months ago I was speaking at Boston College to a classroom full of business students, studying entrepreneurship. It was my third time speaking at BC, at the request of a wonderful professor. One of the questions asked by a student was where I’d gone to college. It was very difficult to answer him. He, a student at BC, and me a high school dropout and entrepreneur on the cusp of selling his company. My reply was awkward, but truthful. I learned by doing. I learned by failing, by succeeding, by winning, by losing. I continue to learn that way. But that’s my way, not a way that works for everyone. He asked what my secret was, a question that also made me feel awkward, as if I had a secret, a genie in a bottle. My answer was simple: passion, but it’s not a secret. Passion, attitude, perspective, these are qualitative attributes that we all possess.

This blog has long been about entrepreneurship, pure and simple. For the foreseeable future I’m taking a long break from entrepreneurship. I’ve got a lot more on the job training to go through. I still have some rough edges that I need to smooth out. And I don’t have any patience for investors. Litle is providing me with fertile ground for me to continue spreading my roots. The company is at an exciting inflection point, facing challenges I can help with, no investors, unrivaled technology, talent, a legacy that won the #1 on the Inc. 500, a customer obsessed culture that won the prestigious Stevie Award last year and is nominated for it yet again. So Your Suspect will now allow me to express and inform on how I apply the lessons of entrepreneurship to a maturing B2B organization, to the Marketing organization within it, to how I interact with and among, learn from, and inspire the Chairman, the CEO, my colleagues, my peers, vendors, clients, etc. And let me tell you, barely two weeks in, I’m overwhelmed by how much opportunity there is to do just that and so much more.

This was a much longer post than I intended, but one that’s long overdue. As I contribute new content to Your Suspect, I will also revisit some of the themes of previous posts, and revisit my experiences with CitySquares, the events leading up to its sale, the sale itself, and the outcome for me, employees, and investors.

I leave you with that, and welcome your comments. Now, I shovel!

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