Locally Owned Businesses: Superior Businesses

Locally owned businesses, aka independant businesses, aka Mom and Pops, are superior to big box retailers in so many ways. Even though I believe this with every nerve in my body sometimes I forget the nuances and subtle qualities that really drive this point home. I’m guilty of shopping at chains and non-locally owned businesses like 99% of America but I truly and wholeheartedly try to shop locally whenever reasonably possible. I go to Porter Square Books to get all my books and if they don’t have it, I order it. I go to Diesel Cafe for my coffee. And when I shop at Trader Joes’s (yes, I know they’re not “local”) I buy organic foods and coffee beans etc, all in an effort to support whatever and whoever I’m told I’m supporting! Unfortunately I don’t have any locally owned pharmacies near me, so I go to CVS. On rare occasions I may go to Starbucks and I’ve been guilty of shopping at others, like Target, Home Depot, whatever. But I really try to avoid it. This past holiday season Ali and I did 90% of our gift shopping at local businesses. Some stuff we just had to buy otherwise, like a specific Brookstone gift. Unfortunately the days of local grocers are mostly gone, but we do try to shop at local butcher shops and farm stands and such. I do not like Home Depot and I try very hard to go to locally owned and operated hardware supply stores. I’ve learned a lot about Ace and True Value as a result of this and make no mistake about it – Ace and True Value stores are still very much locally owned and operated retail stores.

I think most of the population probably doesn’t concern themselves with this too much. They don’t intentionally go out of their way to Buy Local. When they need a new rake for their lawn, they go to Home Depot or Lowe’s. When they need a coffee they go to Dunkin Donuts or Starbucks. When they need some food they go to Stop and Shop. And the national brands like those I just named have such deep pockets, they can outspend and out-advertise any local guy. They can cast so broad a net that we’re just all victims of their marketing and branding and it becomes almost instinct. You think soda – you think Coke. You think car, you think Ford. You think clothing, you think Filene’s. Ever since I was a little boy sitting in front of the TV eating cereal I’ve been bombarded with these ads. Sears, Home Depot, Circuit City, Macy’s, whatever – I’ve been groomed into this zombie consumer. MUST SHOP HERE. MUST GO THERE. NO OPTIONS.

When I was a kid I went to the same local barber with my dad every 2 weeks, I went to the same hardware store, more often than I liked. Most everything we bought was bought locally. My father is a republican, mind you (or was). He loves Nixon, loves Reagan – so this had nothing to do with politics or policy. It was how he was raised too, in NYC. Neighborhood stores in Brooklyn, the Bronx. So for me, the occasional trip to say, Child World, or Montgomery Ward was, again, occasional. It wasn’t the only choice. Heck, I don’t even remember Wal-Mart as a kid. It seemed to spring up when I was a teenager out of nowhere, but that’s here in the northeast. Anyway, I digress. Point is, I have fond memories of local stores and service providers. I don’t have memories of long and towering aisles at Sam’s Club, or grumpy people standing in lines at Wal-Mart.

So when I started CitySquares back in 2005 it was as much about local businesses, neighborhood businesses as it was about anything else. Our message is clear – BUY LOCAL. But we’re not obnoxious about, we’re not pious about it – we can’t be. And also, we ultimately respect people’s own individual rights to shop wherever they want to shop. At the end of the day, a larger portion of society does shop with their wallets. It’s nothing against local businesses, and they may even understand the value of shopping locally, but for them, it’s a matter of dollars and cents. If they can buy a box of crayons at Wal-Mart for 69 cents less than they can at a local toy store, then there are likely other savings for them and that’s ultimately what drives them. They may care deeply about the economic benefits of shopping locally – and there are many – but they have a family of four and the budget is very tight. So as far as they’re concerned, “thanks for the enlightenment buddy but I’ve got 3 kids to feed and a mortgage to pay!” And we respect that. That’s also why we continue to list non-locally owned businesses. We don’t ask them for their advertising dollars but we still put them on the website. That’s for us to be meaningful and credible.

Anyway, as you see, I’m passionate about this stuff. It’s not just a drum I’m beating either – I believe in it greatly and I believe in the importance of shopping locally as much as the next guy.

To wrap things up, I’m writing this because many people have heard me talk about it before, some people have heard me talk about it so much that it’s making them crazy (but they get it!) and I finally realized that I haven’t really blogged about it at any length. I got inspired this weekend when Ali and I had some very inspiring local shopping experiences. But I won’t get into that right now, I’m only on one cup of coffee and I feel like I could talk about this forever. But I will be talking about this more, you can bet on that.